Juice Jacking? The New but Old Revolution of Hacking Attacks!

Juice Jacking is an attack-type that involves plugging your phone into public sockets for “charging purposes”. The truth behind these sockets is the installation of malware on your phones and other electronic devices of unsuspecting users.

These attacks occur most often at public charging stations such as ones in airports or hotels. Once the device is connected to a socket, the malware infects it and could potentially export data such as passwords directly to the scammers.

Juice Jacking goes so far back to 2011 when it was first mentioned in DefCon. It was demonstrated by researchers by setting up an attack scenario at a public charging kiosk. The attack, however, was observed in 2013 when a Proof-of-Concept for Mactans was introduced by a Black Hat conference by some researchers. The malware would install itself on an IOS device in 80 seconds; the attacked iOS device would look normal and act normal but, in the background, a trojan would be launched as soon as a user had opened Facebook.

A new security term known as ‘Video Jacking’ is the “new” 2016 buzzword. This attack involves a HDMI ready smartphone. This will allow an attacker to view the unsuspecting user’s screen and gain information from the display. This gives an attack the visual information which could be at a login screen.